In this blog we will share with you our vision of beauty, balance, harmony.

As Mark Leach writes in his book Raw Colour with Pastels: “Sound is all around us, and it is musicians who refine that sound into something of beauty. As a painter, I have always felt that my purpose is to craft colour in a similar way, to see through the confusion and seek harmony and beauty.”

And we add: Words, fragments of sentences, spoken noise is all around us, and Ken arranges words in such a way as to capture beauty in the accidental, the ambient soundtrack of life.

Sunday, February 3, 2013

Roots

Verwurzelt - Rooted 23 x 30,5 cm





AMERICA’S DREAMING

One day it must have been the other
day I was talking to a guy in a bar
harsh daylight outside, inside as dark
as a mine shaft with neon beer logos 
lighting the way to alcoholic oblivion
and I was trying to remember Ingmar Bergman’s
camera man, his name, not the grace
and intelligence of his artistry, only his name,
when I by the way asked this guy what he did for a living.
Just passing through, he answered, just drifting by.
Well, right-on to that, I said, and we bumped fists softly.

Sven something, I said, slapping the bar.
He’s the camera guy.
The Swedes have contributed
mightily to this country, the man whose
name I didn’t know said. Let’s not
forget the Irish, I countered, gentle but firm,
their unerring sense of music and unprecedented mastery
of what is essentially the language of their oppressors.
A strangely aborted wet sound filled the air as the barman
tried to soak up some spilt beer with a dry sponge.
So much of what we say, the man said, is inconsequential.

That’s why people everywhere prefer to dream.
Just outside the Pottery
Barn in Vermont, or the Cheese factory
in Wisconsin, or the Edible Complex in Oakland, they’re all dreaming.
On a flight between LAX and Houston two manic-talking
bloated business dudes, each taking a breath, pausing  
to observe the finely articulated bottom and hips of a passing stewardess,
are dreaming too, even when they’re wide awake at 30,000 feet up.  




 3rd movement, New World Sypmphony by Antonin Dvorak
conducted by Herbert von Karajan

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